What's New

To prevent violence against women and girls, community leaders come together

At the Fund, we know that true equality for women and girls means strong, locally-rooted women’s rights activism that disrupts power structures and cultural norms—some of which are centuries old—that relegate women to second-class status. In every region in which we work, we support talented women and men who are committed to changing this status […]

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In Nigeria, activists make headway
in wake of militarization and instability

From the Boko Haram insurgency in the Northeast to the Niger Delta Avengers in the South, life in Nigeria can be insecure and politically unstable. John Kabia, the Fund's Program Officer for West Africa, witnessed this firsthand in February 2017, when he visited our grantees and advisors in the field.

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A new tactic against corruption:
Putting honest politicians in the limelight

Photo courtesy of Accountability Lab  August 7, 2017 “Name and shame” For years, this has been the main approach organizations have used to tackle corruption. Groups employing this tactic work to apprehend corrupt politicians, then broadcast their names publicly to discourage others from committing similar acts. And while some progress has been made, this method […]

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New threats against human rights
defenders require new kinds of protection

Human rights organizations and funders in Latin America need to rethink how they protect defenders in light of increasing threats from non-state actors and impunity encouraged by the state.   By Padre Melo July 11, 2017 This post originally appeared on OpenGlobalRights website; article reposted with permission. Beyond the tragic stories and shocking statistics of environmental and […]

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Video: Activists need new tools to protect themselves

  A record number of activists are being killed in Latin America – and old methods of security aren’t working. How do we protect activists facing threats from shadowy actors and complicit governments? To begin answering this question, the Fund for Global Human Rights and Just Associates (JASS) brought together activists from Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, […]

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Years of LGBTI Activism in the Philippines Nearing Landmark Victory

LAGABLAB (“Burst of Flame” in Tagalog), the Philippine’s first LGBTI group dedicated to policy change, has worked on and off for nearly two decades to advance policies that protect LGBTI Filipinos. And one of their biggest wins for the community is in the making.

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Beyond the Courtroom:
A personal approach to justice in Guatemala

As victims and their families in Guatemala have sought truth and justice for crimes committed during the country’s 30-year civil war, Fund grantee Equipo de Estudios Comunitarios y de Acción Psicosocial (ECAP) has played a key supporting role. Founded in 1997, ECAP provides crucial psychosocial support to witnesses, victims, experts, and even judges involved in the transitional justice trials. ECAP’s role has been vital in trials like the Sepur Zarco case, which marked the first time sexual slavery during war was prosecuted in the country in which it was committed.

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Passing the Microphone: Migrants Tell Their Stories

June 20, 2017 The Fund for Global Human Rights is committed to building support and fostering advocacy for the rights of migrants – individuals who are forcibly displaced, fleeing conflict, and seeking safety and opportunity. On World Refugee Day, we’re sharing two firsthand accounts from migrants who faced violence when they were fleeing their home […]

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Beyond Borders:
Bringing Activists Together for Migrants’ Rights

June 19, 2017 Last month, during the 2017 Sabir Festival of the Mediterranean Cultures in Syracuse, Sicily, migrants’ rights groups from the Euro-Mediterranean and Latin America came together to share their experiences and collaborate. With some activists traveling hundreds of miles to attend, the festival presented a rare opportunity for migrants’ rights organizations working in vastly different […]

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Only 25% of kids in the DRC have birth certificates.
Mothers are changing that.

Imagine giving birth to a healthy baby, but being unable to prove that the infant is yours. Imagine your child, older now, being refused enrollment in school and denied healthcare. For many new mothers living in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, this is an everyday reality. All because their children don’t have birth certificates. While Congolese law requires families to register their newborns within 90 days, this can be a near-impossible task, especially for poor parents and those living in remote areas.

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