Stories from the Field

Seeking truth when loved ones disappear

“My father’s brother was disappeared. We never found out what happened to him.” – Maria,* age 28 To say that Guatemala’s thirty-six-year civil war was brutal is an understatement. An estimated 45,000 people were forcibly disappeared — and another 200,000 killed. Heartbreaking accounts of the conflict include stories of capture, torture, rape, and massacre. However, […]

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The NextGen leader championing women & minorities

Courage. Resilience. Determination. Tenacity. Grit. Whatever you choose to call it, the qualities that compelled Wai Wai Nu to take the tragic denial of her rights – and subsequent imprisonment during what should have been her university years – and turn that experience into a force for good is nothing short of extraordinary.   In […]

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Memory and Justice in Guatemala

March 3, 2016 For 36 years, Guatemala was engaged in a bloody civil war. From 1960 to 1996, thousands of rural and indigenous people were displaced, tortured, and raped, and over 200,000 people were killed in 626 documented massacres—most perpetrated by the government against indigenous peoples. Since the end of the war, organizations supported by […]

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The Long Road to Justice in Guinea

Mamadou Diallo never imagined he would lead the fight for justice in one of the most damning cases of human rights violations in Guinea’s recent history. But one tragic day in his early 20s dramatically changed the course of his life. On September 28, 2009, Mamadou – a computer programming graduate – joined friends in […]

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The Dangerous Fight for Justice in Burundi

It was 5:30pm on August 3, 2015. Pierre Claver Mbonimpa was almost home from work in his neighborhood in Bujumbura, when an armed man on a motorcycle pulled up next to his car. He fired at close range, lodging four bullets into Pierre Claver’s face and neck. His life was in danger. Pierre Claver was […]

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Roshni

Karachi is a dangerous city for children living on the margins of society. 3,000  go missing every year, of whom more than 200 are physically or sexually abused. Kidnapped children can be forced into organized begging rings, domestic servitude, labor in shops and brick kilns, and prostitution. For a long time, few of those missing […]

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Q&A with Hoa Duong and Amy Morris

The Fund’s Program Director Amy Morris and Program Officer for Southeast Asia Hoa Duong recently traveled to Burma, where the Fund began its grants program in 2012. We sat down with Amy and Hoa to hear about their trip and ask how Burma and the program have changed in two years. Q: Amy, this was […]

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Action for Community Task (ACT): Mobilizing Women’s Groups to Stop Ebola

Fund Grantees working in their communities are contributing to local efforts to stop the spread of Ebola

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Blanca Velázquez

Inspirational activist risking it all to champion workers’ rights in Mexico Since the 1960s Mexico has had a thriving maquiladora industry, manufacturing and exporting goods for the clothing and automotive sectors. Today, countless maquiladores (factories) give hundreds of thousands of people across Mexico much needed jobs, and the maquila workforce is primarily female. However, these […]

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Building connections among resource rights activists in Ibagué, Colombia

Esra Yarar, Grants Administrator and Program Assistant, discusses a recent convening held by the Fund in Colombia which included Fund grantees working on resource rights and corporate accountability and local Colombian activists.

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