Middle East and North Africa

Passing the Microphone: Migrants Tell Their Stories

June 20, 2017 The Fund for Global Human Rights is committed to building support and fostering advocacy for the rights of migrants – individuals who are forcibly displaced, fleeing conflict, and seeking safety and opportunity. On World Refugee Day, we’re sharing two firsthand accounts from migrants who faced violence when they were fleeing their home […]

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Beyond Borders:
Bringing Activists Together for Migrants’ Rights

June 19, 2017 Last month, during the 2017 Sabir Festival of the Mediterranean Cultures in Syracuse, Sicily, migrants’ rights groups from the Euro-Mediterranean and Latin America came together to share their experiences and collaborate. With some activists traveling hundreds of miles to attend, the festival presented a rare opportunity for migrants’ rights organizations working in vastly different […]

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Justice for Migrants: Sharing lessons between Latin America and the Euro-Mediterranean

While migration is a time old phenomenon, the last few years have seen a series of acute refugee crises erupt around the globe. Across Latin America, South East Asia, Africa and the Middle East, widespread conflict, political violence and chronic poverty are driving increasing numbers to risk everything in search of safer and better lives. The most visible of these crises is in the Euro-Mediterranean region, through which hundreds of thousands of migrants have fled since 2014.

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Chloée’s Journey Part 2

Migrants sitting on the border fence between the Spanish enclave of Melilla and Morocco. Photo courtesy of José Palazon. December 18, 2016 Written by Chloée Ponchelet Chloée Ponchelet is the Fund’s Program Officer for Migrants’ Rights, overseeing the Fund’s initiative to support activists that document and expose the grim reality facing migrants in transit, and advocate […]

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48 hours in the life of Fund grantee Caminando

Migrants in the woods of Nador, Morocco learning about their rights as they make their way north. Faces blurred to protect identities. December 17, 2016 Written by Chloée Ponchelet Chloée Ponchelet is the Fund’s Program Officer for Migrants’ Rights, overseeing the Fund’s initiative to support activists that document and expose the grim reality facing migrants […]

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In the Name of Security: When Silencing Active Citizens Creates Even Greater Problems

The global governance frameworks around counterterrorism and international development have framed the role, value and impact of civil society as a critical ally but also, more recently, as a threat. At best, donor governments have acknowledged civil society as a key partner in fostering development, peace and security. At worst, some aid recipient governments have sought to limit the role of development and human rights groups only to delivering public services, or they view civil society as an enabler for funding terrorist groups. Yet there are opportunities for civil society actors to use counterterrorism and development policies and processes to their advantage.

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Internationally Engaged Foundations: Coping with the Disabling Environment

Over the past several years, internationally engaged foundations have faced unprecedented challenges from governments around the world. This is just one element of the ‘closing space’ or the ‘disabling environment’ for international philanthropy. Whatever you name it, there are forces at work that are challenging the very existence of civil society.

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The Global Siege on Civil Society

Dozens of governments are adopting means to limit the activities of NGOs and impede their access to foreign funds. Beijing, for example, just passed a law that restricts the activities of foreign NGOs and subjects them to police investigation. Unfortunately, the Chinese communist party is just one of many governments to do so. Indeed, this law is part of a robust, international trend of similar legislation implemented by politicians that fear the interference of foreigners as well as civil society’s unprecedented capacity to mobilize — which is due in part to new technologies.

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